‘NGK’ Movie Review: An unnatural and mind-numbing film

Screen Shot 2019-06-08 at 5.08.07 PM
Source: Sony Music South | Youtube

A guy says in a different context in NGK that something weird is happening and that they have not given any information so far. Well, weirdly enough, the movie stayed true to this dialogue.

There’s a greenish background and Nandha Gopala Kumaran aka Kumaran (played by Suriya) keeps staring at the camera, placed very close to his face, with a blank expression. This brief scene comes twice in NGK (Once at the beginning and secondly soon after the intermission). There’s a high possibility that, while tolerating this stodgy film, you may be able to correlate with these brief instances. You will be ending up watching the entire movie with the same blank countenance and can think of the dark surroundings of your cinema hall same as that greenish background.

Only the premise passed the test of patience as Kumaran, drenched in rain, climbs up the pipes and enters the house in a bid to surprise his wife Geetha (Sai Pallavi), talks to his mother about how working in a corporate company is stressful and unhealthy, and gloriously describes the peaceful life of being a farmer and doing organic farming. Soon after this interesting premise, Director Selvaraghavan offers a feast of mind-numbing sequences in NGK (It was shocking to witness such a film from the director of brilliant films like Mayakkam Enna).

Kumaran, who is a social activist, gets threatened for doing good deeds. He is advised by an old guy to get into actual politics as it would give him the power and authority that he needs to do good to people. And so he does. He joins a political party, starts from cleaning the toilet and eventually becomes the Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu. Well, this does ring a bell if you are apprised of Tamil Nadu politics and will remind you of known persons from the political circle. And there are more references like this. It didn’t seem to mean anything other than just a stupid trial of being relevant with the real-world politics.

The movie feels unnatural in all its essence. The actors seem to be expressing exorbitantly. (The sheer annoyance that Sai Pallavi as the wife of Kumaran creates is too much to endure). Rakul Preet Singh, who plays the Vanathi character, doesn’t seem relevant (But hey! She gets to shake a leg with Suriya in an unnecessarily included song). There are forced inclusions of fight sequences involving Kumaran (Probably an attempt to give you a feeling of an adrenaline rush). Even Kumaran, who sort of turns psychotic in the latter half, looks irksome.

I am not sure what the movie really tried to say in all its oddities. As a matter of fact, it caused such restlessness that I didn’t bother knowing what this movie was all about and somehow managed to sit through the whole movie. One thing that really stood out was the amazing background score from Yuvan Shankar Raja. Otherwise, there is a dialogue in the film that fitted well with the kind of experience it offers and the ultimate thought it leaves you with. A guy says in a different context in NGK that something weird is happening and that they have not given any information so far. Well, weirdly enough, the movie stayed true to this dialogue.

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